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Web Development Web Security

How to add CSRF protection to Symfony 5+ forms

How CSRF works

What you are basically doing with CSRF is trying to make sure a hacker has not created a fake form to gather private information from your user.

You want your app to create a unique string and save it on the server in a session cookie or database, redis etc. Then you add that string to a form in a hidden field. When the form is submitted by the user you fetch the CSRF string you created server side and compare it to the value in the form.

If the values match there was no hacking attempt and you can trust it. If the values do not match then a hacker has probably done something and you should not trust the form submission.

My interweb searches on this subject were not very helpful the other day. So, today I dig into the docs.

on the case detective meme
Time to be a Symfony detective

The first place to look is in the documentation for the security component. That article doesn’t say much about CSRF, but it has lots of links to how the Security system works in Symfony.

In the article above is a link of gold, How to implement CSRF protection.  I didn’t even find this in my  searches for “Symfony CSRF” protection yesterday. I am not sure why, maybe it was further down the list. This article contains some very helpful information though.

You may want to check your current configuration to see if you have enabled CSRF.

So it appears here that just adding to the configuration adds CSRF protection to all forms? Which I find confusing. Like this is truly the only change we need to make?

no way meme
Is it really that easy?

But that is only with forms created using Symfony form tools. If you create a custom form, not using Symfony form system, say REACT, you will need to implement your own CSRF more here.

Here is a good video about Symfony form security and shows how to quickly build an entire app with Symfony

Links

If you need to use PUT with CSRF protection see this SymfonyCast.

Here is a nice SymfonyCast about CSRF with a REST API.

SymfonyCast about CSRF with ReactJs.

Samesite cookie configuration in Symfony docs

Here is a nice Symfony bundle for 2 factor identification with CSRF

This awesome SymfonyCast covers security in  Symfony version 4 but most of it still applies to Symfony 5. It talks more about how using the Symfony form bundle automatically adds CSRF protection when enabled.

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Software Development Web Development Web Security

Authentication vs Authorization what is the difference?

Authentication/Authorization these terms are often confused. Here I will clarify them.

Authentication — Login, proving who a user is one way or another. After a user is logged into a system a session cookie is usually created to re-authenticate the user so they don’t have to login every single page view.

Authorization — Can a user view or access something once Authenticated? Authorization includes things like administration panel access, viewing a users profile or post or media etc.

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Software Development Web Development Web Security

How to create ssh keys for admin user login without passwords

The idea is to have a way for an admins to SSH into a server without having to use passwords. This adds a level of security to your server setup. Without private keys you have to enter your user name and password. This can be less secure than generating SSH keys and adding your public key to SSH, plus with keys you don’t have to remember passwords.

First you need to generate the SSH keys. I prefer the ed25519 algorithm which is a newer one. You can get more info here.  

The code to create an ed25519 ssh key in the current users .ssh directory will look like this.


ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/key-name -t ed25519  

The -f flag tells ssh-keygen the name of the files you want to create. The above command would create key-name(private key) and key-name.pub(public) key, in the current users .ssh directory. The ~ is a Linux shortcut meaning /home/current_user/ so you don’t have to type all that.

The -t flag tells ssh-keygen what type of algorithm to use. If you don’t specify the -f flag and give the file a name, then both files are output in the current users .ssh directory as ed25519 and ed25519.pub

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Resources Software Development Web Security

Stupid linux issues.

This is my collection of stupid.

Top of the list Debian/Ubuntu removes apt-key support and doesn’t tell anyone they did it, doesn’t give anyone a single hint as to what to do. No just remove/deprecate shit and don’t tell a single soul on earth. This kind of stupid makes me want to leave the industry entirely. I get so tired of messed up  and undocumented shit that wastes hours and hours and hours of my time. Someone needs kicked for this.

More info and links about the above issue or removing apt-key support. Yarn suggests using apt-key so this means hundreds of millions of people are having this issue or will or could.
Even more info about the stupid ideas from above.

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Software Development Web Development Web Security

How to create ssh deploy keys for github

One issue with creating SSH keys is there are so many ways to do it and no one tells you why they do what they do. A quick search will reveal almost everyone has their own way of doing it.  If you are new to ssh keys I suggest you read this article really quick.

In the github docs they tell you how to create the ssh keys like this

ssh-keygen -t ed25519 -C "your_email@example.com" 

I prefer using the following command instead :

ssh-keygen -t ed25519 -f /home/akashicseer/tests/ssh/file_name -C "akashicseer@gmail.com"

Quick command facts:

  1. ed25519 is basically the newest type of key, it is supposed to be the most secure
  2. -C is for adding a comment to the key. This helps you identify it later in places like ~/.ssh/known_hosts, ~/.ssh/authorized_keys and when you use the command ssh-add -L which prints out your public key info
  3. -t specifies the type of key. The above command tells ssh-keygen to create an ed25519 type of key more info
  4. -f /home/akashicseer/tests/ssh/file_name This tells ssh-keygen where to put the file. If you don’t specify the name then it will use a default of something like id_ed25519 for private key and id_ed25519.pub for the public key. The code above will put the files named file_name (private key) and file_name.pub ( public key) in the folder /home/akashicseer/tests/ssh/ If you don’t specify the full path to the exact folder your keys will be put into your users home directory in the default .ssh location. On Ubuntu this is /home/username/.ssh/

NOTE: for ssh deploy keys, don’t specify a passphrase when you create them or you will have to manually enter it later when Packer or whatever you use runs your provisioning code. That means you won’t be able to automate if you enter a passphrase, because it will ask the terminal user to enter the phrase to do a git clone.

There are different types of ssh keys. If you don’t add the ed25519 part then a regular ssh key of type rsa is created, this is the default type of ssh key. Basically Github documentation is showing how to create a secure type of key to use with your code deployments. You will use this key to clone your repository to your server instances.

Creating the key is only half the battle. You must decide how you will create the key, especially if you are automating deployments. When automating deployments the process becomes very complicated.

First either you create the keys you need in the instance you are creating then use the github api to add them to the proper repo. Or you create the keys on a local development computer and use something like Hashicorp Packer to upload the files to the server instance during creation. The latter is the easiest way especially in automation of the infrastructure.

If you are creating your keys locally and using Packer to upload them, you will need to login to Github and go to the deploy keys section of the specific repo to add your public key. The public key is the one that ends in .pub usually. The easiest way to copy the key value is to use xclip which I mention in this article.

If fully automating the process and creating the key on the actual instance, you must remember to eventually remove older keys. Github lets you have like 50 keys per repo max. If your repo needs to be deployed to many instances, such as a microservice structure you can contact them to get added key abilities. You could also reuse the same key, but that would require keeping the private key in a repo as well which probably isn’t a very good idea at all, since ssh keys are the same as passwords basically.

Also remember this. If you are using deploy keys only to deploy by cloning the repo, then deleting the key after the clone is perfectly fine. You only need to use this key one time to clone (aka deploy ) your code, after this it is useless. You can and probably should create new SSH keys for deployment each time and remove them from Github after you deploy, then delete them from the server instance.

Unless you plan on keeping the same instance up and trying to pull from the repo etc. That is messy. Personally I’d prefer to use Packer to create new instances when I need to and redeploy. This has the added benefit that I can upgrade the instance with security etc., test it, add my app code, test it, then swap over after migrating the database and other files. This is like creating a clean slate every time.

You will also need to know how to add the keys to ssh-agent and use them, which I cover in this article.

Here is a link to a list of resources about ssh.

Categories
Resources Software Development Web Development Web Security

SSL links, videos and other resources.

SSL is a very important subject. All websites/apps should be using it. However the docs will leave you scratching your head saying WTF? So I am creating this long list of resources for anyone else who ever has to learn how to use it.

Articles

First here is a link to the docs – this will cause confusion as nothing tells you how to use the pieces together.  So it is like looking into a box of legos and knowing it builds something but you don’t even have a picture as a hint. The best you can do is use the pieces to build something that doesn’t even resemble the original creation.

OpenSSL quick reference by digicert – a very brief introduction to SSL and how it works

SSL Certificate Security Glossary – list of terms and definitions

How to create a CSR with openssl – shows some of the syntax for the -config file option.

Docs explaining the config file found in the article above bout how to create a csr with openssl

SSL Basics: What is a Certificate Signing Request (CSR)? – Exactly WTF is a CSR

Openssl config file example – openssl docs are pure 100% utter shit. I had to dig and dig and google and dig for days to find this.


Videos

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Web Development Web Security

Our programming tools are stuck in the past

Recently I decided to start automating my infrastructure. Before this it had never occurred to me how stuck in the past our ancient tools are.

These days we have the cloud. We can fire instances up in seconds. But to do this we need ways of automating things. Tools such as SSH, SSL, GIT etc. feel stuck in the 1990’s . The 1990’s was a period of time when server admins bragged about how many days/hours their servers had been online. No really that was seriously a thing.

In the 1990’s there basically was 0 automation. The only people automating things were shell scripters and they were seen as genius wizards who casted spells and worked magic.

Automating infrastructure provisioning

I’m not saying automation is impossible with today’s tools, but it is insanely hard. The hardest part is finding accurate information, because reading the docs will do nothing but leave you lost as hell. Most docs read like notes for those who already know how to use it, complete with lack of examples.
I can’t be the only person who is like WTF are you talking about when reading docs.

This is the best you can explain this FFS?

One major problem with automating with today’s tools is the fact they were designed mostly for manual use in a different time period. By this I mean most ask a series of questions that are hard as hell to answer automatically, OR EVEN FIGURE OUT THE SYNTAX TO DO SO.

This is some of the syntax I found online suggesting how to answer the questions. I borked it a little with this command, I later found out.


openssl req -x509 -nodes -days 365 -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout /etc/ssl/private/nginx-selfsigned.key -out /etc/ssl/certs/nginx-selfsigned.crt<< EOF
echo `#US`
echo `#Florida`
echo `#.`
echo `#.`
echo `#$this_ip`
echo `#"akashicseer@gmail.com"`
EOF

The above code is supposed to use Heredoc syntax which creates an infile file and feeds the info to the prompts. It doesn’t work. Not sure if plain echo “value \” would do it or not, this is the syntax I found. I did get something similar working though.

Now I must spend at least another 24 hours googling and trying and digging, because most info you find about linux is wrong.

Apparently it depends on if the script asking the questions expects answers from stdin or somewhere else, file etc. Plus I saw somewhere in the openssl docs something about echo is turned off or something? I’ll post it if I find it again.

You’ve got to be kidding me.

SSL is even more fun. The docs for it are terrible. It gives you no idea of what to use how to use it etc. Purely written for the already initiated. This is a major problem I see everywhere in Technology and programming. You have people smart enough to create something, but they can’t explain how to use what they created in a way that others can just pick up and use. This causes lots of wasted human time.

It shouldn’t take days to figure out how SSH works and how to automate. Days to figure out how SSL works and automate. Days to figure out how xyz works and automate it.

This is now 2021 we need improvements to tools( especially docs) so we can more easily automate things.  Our tools need to give us example files of the questions they ask and better yet a copy of how to answer them. Our tools need to be able to easily be directed to a file to read the answers from. Our tools need to focus on telling users how to use them.

Our tools need help.

Our tools need help

I have another article coming soon on how to automate SSL/TLS certificate and csr creation with shell scripts. The same can be converted to the command line since shell scripts are just Linux commands in a file with some special syntax SOMETIMES.

Categories
Software Development Web Security

How to use Multiple ssh deploy keys with Github and Git

I came across this issue when automating infrastructure provisioning. I needed a way to pull the repository code for my app in the provisioning scripts. I didn’t want to use the ssh keys I have setup for the entire Github account due to security. I discovered that github has the ability for you to add per repository SSH keys, called Deploy keys.  The docs totally left me in the dark. I had no idea how to do any of this so I had to spend days researching. I decided to write this article to save everyone else hours of time scouring the internet trying to figure out how the hell to do this.

Why use Deploy keys?

Why would you want to use Deploy keys? When automating infrastructure provisioning you don’t want to expose your personal SSH keys. These deploy keys  are going to be used only for cloning a repo, you may be able to use them for other things I didn’t research that not my problem. LOL.

SSH keys when setup correctly, allow a higher level of security than user name and password. Many people are automating by scripting a user name and password, that is BAD. Also if you don’t set a passphrase for the SSH key it won’t prompt for it in the shell terminal. Normally you want your ssh key secured with a pass phrase, but for infrastructure automation we need no pass.

I won’t cover how to automate the infrastructure that would be a series of articles. What I want to cover is how in specific to use multiple SSH keys.

The syntax is wacky as it gets. First off when you are using GIT to pull/push/clone etc. from Github, git is using SSH underneath. So in order to use multiple SSH keys you actually configure SSH not GIT, but git reads the command you type and interacts with SSH on your behalf. Totally confusing. My first few hours were filled with a lot of WTF?

Wait. WTF?

First off the SSH config is stored in your users .ssh directory. On most Linux distributions that is in the user you are logged in as home directory. Basically /home/username/.ssh/ this directory will hold your SSH certs, known_hosts file, config file and others. The ssh config file is always named config and goes in the .ssh directory. If you are logged in as root it will be /root/.ssh/config. Many times when provisioning a server automatically the only user you have at first is root.

Example ssh config file should look like this


   Host hostAlias 
   User git
   Hostname github.com
   IdentityFile=/root/.ssh/id_rsa

Yes it goes in a file exactly like that, no equals, no semicolons no quotes, just 1980’s YAML LOLOL.  The most confusing setting above, which gets more confusing if you read the docs, is Host. Just think of it as Alias. I have no idea why it is even called Host instead of Alias. That threw me and so many others off. I kept putting the same value I had for Hostname. Hostname is the exact name of the host where your repo is, github.com for this example. Identity file is the private key file location.

Another thing to look at is git for the User. You might be able to use other names, but next I’ll show how the name part ties in.

To use the above setting to clone a repo for example you would type the following at the command line.


git clone git@hostAlias:repo-owner-name/repo-name.git .

See the User git and the Host hostAlias. This looks so similar to the regular clone command. For example here is another one of my Github repositories a public one so you can play with this.

git@github.com:AkashicSeer/phphtml.git

This is the default to clone a repo. This has a default name for User of git and a default value for Host of github.com. I haven’t experimented enough yet but I am guessing you can change the name in the configs to anything you want such as Billy and use a command like :
billy@github.com:AkashicSeer/phphtml.git

So back to the question how do you use multiple SSH/Deploy keys with Git and Github?

Like this


   Host hostAlias
   User git
   Hostname github.com
   IdentityFile=/root/.ssh/id_rsa

   Host otherAlias 
   User git
   Hostname github.com
   IdentityFile=/root/.ssh/id_rsa_2

   Host billy 
   User git
   Hostname github.com
   IdentityFile=/root/.ssh/id_rsa_3

Each IdentityFile must be a unique ssh or deploy key, they are the same thing, both are ssh keys.

Then to clone from each for example you would use the following for example.


git clone git@hostAlias:repo-owner-name/repo-name.git .
git clone git@otherAlias:repo-owner-name/repo-name.git .
git clone git@billy:repo-owner-name/repo-name.git .

The format is User@Host:repo-owner-name/actual-repo.git

The dot . I am putting at the end of the clone IS AWESOME.
It tells Git to clone into the current directory and don’t use the name of the repo as the directory name. Basically just clone the damn repo into this damn folder. Without the dot it includes the repo name too. I often just want /opt/app-directory < code in that folder.

AND DON’T FORGET THE SECRET SAUCE

Don’t forget the secret sauce

Now that you have multiple SSH keys you must do some special magic to let SSH know about the keys. For each key you have to tell the ssh-agent it’s name. Basically when SSH does it’s thing your SSH client has to give a list of keys to the SSH agent on the server you are contacting. GIT uses SSH so you must tell SSH where the keys are for your github accounts.

To do this on linux you start the ssh-agent then you add the keys. It is a bit of a pain. First you must start the agent, then you add the key.


#start the agent on linux like so
eval `ssh-agent`
ssh-add /path/to/your/private/key

The value you give to ssh-add command should be the ones you used for your IdentityFile definitions. You will need to add each private key to the agent before it will work.

To test that your setup is working you can do the following and read the output. If there was a problem it will tell you, like it couldn’t find the key.


ssh git@hostAlias
ssh git@otherAlias
ssh git@billy

Running those commands will let you know if everything is configured properly.

BUT IT GETS FUNNER GUYS

The fun is just beginning

All of the 999 things above are still not enough if you want to automate this process.  If you do all of the above and try automating the process, github will prompt you for a passphrase for an ssh key. It won’t be the deploy key either, NO why do that, that would be logical and make sense. What it wants is the passhprhase to the entire account, not the deploy key.

How to fix this?

And there is still, still more, you must chmod the .ssh directory to 600 such as

 chmod -R 600 /home/user/.ssh 

or where ever your ssh files are stored.

You may also need to do the following.

Create a dummy instance. On this instance issue the git clone command. When it asks for the passphrase enter the passphrase for the account that OWNS THE REPO, not the deploy key passphrase which should be empty.

This will add github to known_hosts file. Now use cat to output that info and copy it. You can’t use xclip like I mention in another article, no that’s not allowed for some no brain reason. Once you copy the code from known_hosts create another file on your system called known_hosts. You will need to upload this file along with the ssh deploy keys so that you are not prompted during automated clones.

If there is some sort of openssh setting or a way to do this automatically,  I haven’t found it yet.

If you would like more information on how to create the ssh deploy keys themselves, read this article I wrote.

If you want more information about ssh checkout my list of resources here 

A really good book I found really handy is
SSH Mastery: OpenSSH, PuTTY, Tunnels and Keys (IT Mastery Book 12)

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Software Development Web Security

SSH secure shell links videos and resources

I had a nice article but somehow it got screwed to hell and back. I have no idea what I did. I will not rewrite it. This is now purely a list of resources. I really hate tinymce for this. You can’t just past text from the internet because it auto adds H4’s for some no brain reason. So you have to switch to text view to paste text, then you can switch back and add the link. So helpful.

Articles

SSH keys – basically documentation on the subject by arch linux.

Tutorials point article covering ssh-keygen

Understanding the SSH Encryption and Connection Process – a really decent article going into the details of how SSH actually works underneath for anyone interested. I highly suggest reading this as it eliminates some of the questions you may have.

ssh-keygen – Generate a New SSH Key

SSH command – article about SSH on

SSH manual.– a 1990’s looking manual LOL basically the SSH documentation from what I can see.

Really good DigitalOcean article/manual about SSH

How to manage multiple SSH key pairs

SSH Keys with Multiple GitHub Accounts 

Configuring openssh for passwordless login- a guide by ubuntu about how to setup openssh to allow logins by ssh without passwords.

Host Vs HostName – you know just to be confusing

Fix: Pseudo-terminal will not be allocated because stdin is not a terminal – because SSH is stuck in 1990 and you need to give passwords and answer yes EVERYWHERE This totally makes scripting automated server deploys EXTREMELY HARD.

Securely add a host (e.g. GitHub) to the SSH known_hosts file

Managing Your SSH known_hosts Using Git

SSH known_host file syntax specification and information.


Videos

The below video gives a little history of how SSH came about. It also covers how SSH works to send and receive data.


This video goes into more depth about SSH and how to use it.

Categories
Software Development Web Security

Forced password changes are not good security policy

For so long I have read and heard that a GREAT security feature is to force your users to change passwords every so many days/months. Linux even has a built in feature for this.

This is a really stupid idea for many, many reasons. #1 a password is a password is a password. If a hacker can guess one they can guess another. Simply forcing users to change passwords is a false feeling of security.

Another reason it is a piss poor idea is, users usually use another form of their password so they can remember it, which again solves nothing whatsoever.

Another reason this is a stupid idea is people will often forget their password.

Another reason this is a bad idea is because users usually either write their password down or store it in a regular note type program on their phone, more are using password saving software. I once used a password saver, it worked great it saved all my passwords… except for the password to unlock it. I quit using them after that. LOL

You can read more about the treacheries of forced password cycling here.

You will notice others say the same things and more here.

Even Microsoft realizes this is bad idea that should be left in the past.