Categories
Web Development

How to quickly create a Symfony 5+ controller

A Symfony 5 controller is just a class. You could just use your IDE to create a new class  for you, but you would need  to add some boiler plate code like the namespace and then extend AbstractController and add some use statements etc.

Symfony 5+ has a better way though. With just one command you can have a new controller created with the basic boiler plate already created. How do you ask? With a simple Symfony maker command.

php bin/console make:controller NewControllerName

IT is that easy. Now you can go to the new Controller and start adding methods. Here is a deeper explanation.

This also creates a template. You can delete the template if you don’t need it or leave it. I got the following output when creating UserImageController


created: src/Controller/UserImageController.php
created: templates/user_image/index.html.twig
Categories
rants

Ubuntu 20 slow and freezes often

I’ve used Ubuntu since version 8 or about 2009/2010ish. It used to be super fast. You used to be able to run it on ANYTHING. It was easy to use. I can’t take the damn slowness these days.

Update. Apparently Gnome is the culprit plus some other useless crap. Some say Kubuntu is faster. I don’t have time to dink around with this right now.

Here is a total list of all the things that still suck on ALL linux desktops in 2022 Major Linux problems on the desktop 2022 edition.

These days Ubuntu is SLOWER THAN MOLASSES IN THE WINTER IN SIBERIA. So slow I am HONESTLY thinking about switching back to Windows just so I can work. I rather spend my time working than investigating and typing utter bullshit cryptic commands into the command line.

nothing works meme
Ubuntu 20

Booting is extra slow, 3 to 5 minutes on an i7 with 16Gb ram. That is purely insane. I think this is a record honestly.

Opening any program is slower than hell, whether it is a browser or an IDE, Slow. Slow and slow.

CONSTANT CRASHES AND FREEZES.

Linux has a special trick called freeze…

And once this MOFO freezes, you can’t do shit. Nothing works.  No combination of keys on the keyboard will give any result. Your only option with Ubuntu/Linux desktop is to un-plug your PC.

ISN’T THAT JUST SUPER….

I don’t feel like digging into any files to figure out WTF this pile of bile is doing. I am guessing Ubuntu/Mint (this all happens on another PC I am running mint on) TOTALLY SUCKS at memory management, as the freezes almost always happen when I am using a browser. Honestly I use my computer to get shit done not to screw around playing with the command line trying to get everything working so I can feel extra smart.

That shit is for kids. In adultland we need our PC to turn on and run programs and function and shit like that.

sarcastic kid meme
DERP

But the slowness and freezing really sucks and is pushing me to move back to Windows for web development and programming. Plus most of the image editing, video editing, etc. etc. etc. software for Linux desktop is not worth the shit. Hell most of the software for linux desktop is chock full o bugs.

I sent someone my resume I created with LibreOffice they sent me an email back saying they couldn’t open it. Yay, we still have that old ass issue in 2021???

homer simpson meme
My first encounter with an app using an ORM

Then you got the damn issues with print drivers and video drivers and drivers in general. In reality you are lucky if you get a PC to run Linux desktop properly. And don’t give me this shit about flavor xxx is better. They are all built from the same damn kernel, which is what most functionality is built on.

Right now I need my computer to work. I have too much to do to stop and investigate why Linux is not working and dig through logs and google and go to forum after forum, for 2 damn days.

Screw that and soon screw Linux desktop too.

I am over the sluggishness.

Over the super hard freezes.

Over the slow startups.

Over the slow everything and piss poor memory management.

It probably doesn’t even use all 8 cores either. And to think you used to be able to run Ubuntu on tiny devices.
I bet the Linux Fanboys are having some hyperventilating butthurt right now, gonna leave me lots of comments. They never read the article, then leave the dumbest comments.

I love you guys too and I want to help you heal that butthurt.

Categories
Web Development Web Security

Faking Enumerations with Vanilla javascript

What is an Enumeration?

An Enumeration is a way to create a limited list of options to choose from.This is useful for keeping a list of field names for a form so you can use javascript to animate something for example.

Having a limited list of options is helpful so that you can eliminate bugs due to misspellings (very common in Javascript UI programming).

A limited list also helps so that you can just type and your IDE gives you suggestions to jog your memory of the available options so you don’t have to dive into code.

See the limitations section.

Javascript has no Enums yet

Javascript has no such concept as an enumerated class… yet( the keyword enum is reserved so maybe in the future). Heck it is 2021 and PHP just got Enum classes.  While it does allow class level variables they are defined in the most funky way inside the constructor with this keyword.

Uhm, wait… what?

I say funky because with most other languages you define variables at the class level, then instantiate them ( give them a starting value ) inside the constructor for example. Just be glad you don’t have to use the old syntax What does prototypical Javascript look like?

So to define class level variables in Javascript you need to do so inside the constructor using the this keyword. The reason for this is how the Javascript prototype system works.

class Rectangle {
  constructor(height, width) {
    this.height = height;
    this.width = width;
  }
}
Before Javascript classes… remembering this

Now anywhere inside the class you can get or set the value by this.height or this.width. You can’t set any constants like this though. Constants have to be defined outside the class if you want to use them inside a class, in all methods/functions. You can define a constant inside a function ( aka constructor ) but it is limited to the function in scope just like the let keyword.

But what if you want something like a list of constants or values that can be used? For example I like to keep my form field id’s inside an Enum to be able to easily refer to the field I need, but how can I do this with Javascript?

The answer

The easiest way I have come up with is to NOT USE a class at all. Instead I just use a simple file with a constant set to an object with a list of values. Sure you could just make a list of constants, but there are downsides to that. For one you would need to export them in order to import and use them.

I prefer to create a constant set to a literal object value inside of a single file, like this.

const MEDIA_FORM_FIELDS_ENUM = {
    ALLOW_COMMENTS: 'allow_comments',
    COLLECTION: 'collection',
    CONTENT_RATING: 'content_rating',
    DESCRIPTION: 'description',
    HASHTAGS: 'hashtags',
    PUBLISHED: 'published',
    REUSE_TYPE: 'reuse_type',
    TITLE: 'title'
};

export {MEDIA_FORM_FIELDS_ENUM};

Note the export.

Then I use it like this in my form or form fragment in this case.

Note the import.

import {MEDIA_FORM_FIELDS_ENUM as fields} from "../enums/MediaFormFieldsEnum";

class MediaOptions {
    static getMediaOptions(mediaType) {
        let collection = fields.COLLECTION;
        let comments = fields.ALLOW_COMMENTS;
        let description = fields.DESCRIPTION;
        let hashtags = fields.HASHTAGS;
        let published = fields.PUBLISHED;
        let reuse = fields.REUSE_TYPE;
        let title = fields.TITLE;

        return `
        <div id="media-options" class="container">
            
            <div class="form-group">
             <label for="content-rating" >${mediaType} rating</label>
               <select name="content-rating" id="content-rating" class="form-control" >
                  <option selected value="rating-everyone" id="rating-everyone" >Everyone</option>
                  <option  value="rating-mature" id="rating-mature">Mature</option>
                  <option value="rating-xrated" id="rating-xrated" >Adult rated-x</option>
               </select>
            </div>
         
          <div class="form-group">
            <label for="${title}">${mediaType} Title</label>
            <input type="text" class="form-control" id="${title}" name="${title}">
          </div>
          
          <div class="form-group">
            <label for="${description}" >${mediaType} Description</label>
            <textarea rows="5" id="${description}" name="${description}" 
            placeholder="describe the image in 200 characters" class="form-control" ></textarea>
          </div>
          
          <div class="form-group">
                <label for="${hashtags}" >${mediaType} Hashtags</label>
                <textarea rows="2" id="${hashtags}" name="${hashtags}"
                 placeholder="separate hashtags with space" class="form-control" ></textarea>
          </div>
             
          <div class="form-group">
            <label for="${collection}">${mediaType} Collection</label>
            <input type="text" class="form-control" id="${collection}" name="${collection}">
          </div>
          
          <div class="form-row">Published/visible status</div>
          <div class="form-check">
            <input class="form-check-input" type="radio" name="${published}"
             id="${published}" value="published" checked>
            <label class="form-check-label" for="${published}">
             Published ( visible to others )
            </label>
          </div>
          <div class="form-check">
            <input class="form-check-input" type="radio" name="${published}"
             id="unpublished" value="unpublished">
            <label class="form-check-label" for="unpublished">
             Un-Published ( visible to only you )
            </label>
          </div>
          
          <div class="form-group">
             <label for="${comments}">Allow comments</label>
               <select name="${comments}" id="${comments}" class="form-control" >
                  <option value="followers" >Buyers only/no one/private</option>
                  <option selected value="everyone" >Everyone & Buyers</option>
                  <option value="followers" >Followers & Buyers</option>
               </select>
           </div>
             
          <div class="form-group">
             <label for="${reuse}" >Allow reuse</label>
               <select name="${reuse}" id="${reuse}" class="form-control" >
                  <option selected value="none" id="reuse-none" >None/private (me only)</option>
                  <option  value="free" id="reuse-free">Free</option>
                  <option value="credits" id="reuse-credits" >Credits</option>
               </select>
            </div>
           
        </div>
        `;
    }
}

export {MediaOptions}

That is a lot of code. Note it is HTML inside of a Javascript Literal. I’ll write another article about creating templates with Javascript literals later. For now note how I imported it and used it. I could have just called the fields.OPTIONS but that is longer than a variable name.

I use the above code by importing it into yet another file that builds a whole form but only when called. Like I said I’ll have to write an article about the Javascript Literals, because wow they are handy.

Vanilla javascript might be a little more work, but in the end when something doesn’t work you know exactly why and exactly where to look. And if it is a bug… IT IS YOUR BUG and you can quickly fix it and move right along.

Limitations

Javascript is a real screwy language with lots of limitations and quirks. Many don’t make a lick of sense, unless you have the unlimited free time to dig deeply into the internet to dig deeply into how the Interpreter works.

The above was working fine… until I tried to use it in an Object. When I try to use something like

let stupidObj = { ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_CONTENT_RATING_CHANGE : 'no', 'test' : 'value' };

But this does not work. You will get an error of some type or another. The error I got was something like ” , found expecting ; ” and then a lot of lines of barfarony.

Javascript interpreter was all like…

baby threw up meme
The limitations are real.

So I figured ok maybe store it in a variable and then try that.

const tester = ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_CONTENT_RATING_CHANGE;
let stupidObj = { tester : 'no', 'test' : 'value' };

That doesn’t work either. The interpreter doesn’t interpret the const tester as the tester I wanted to use as the object key so it outputs something different.
The idea here is I want to store all of the key names in a constant and use them later to build an object. This way I for sure know I will spell the key names correctly and I don’t have to remember them all, my IDE can show me the list.  This way I can request some data with AJAX and set the values for an object, then use the object to manipulate the values or use them.

Using the fake enums like this works perfectly fine.


import {JsCollection} from "./JsCollection";
import {ImageDataEnum} from "../enums/ImageDataEnum";
import {Utils} from "./Utils";

class ImageData {

    constructor(imageData) {
        this.imageData = new JsCollection();
        this.setValues(imageData);
    }

    getAllowComments(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_COMMENTS);
    }

    getAllowResale(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_RESALE);
    }

    getAllowContentRatingChange(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_CONTENT_RATING_CHANGE);
    }

    getAltText(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.ALT_TEXT);
    }

    getCollectionName(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.COLLECTION_NAME);
    }

    getContentRating(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.CONTENT_RATING);
    }

    getCreationDatetime(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.CREATION_DATETIME);
    }

    getDescription(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.DESCRIPTION);
    }

    getFileUrl(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_FILE_URL);
    }

    getHashTags(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.HASHTAGS);
    }

    getImageFileData(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_DATA_FILE);
    }

    getImageId(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_ID);
    }

    getLanguageCode(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.LANGUAGE_CODE);
    }

    getLastEditDatetime(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.LAST_EDIT_TIMESTAMP);
    }

    getPublishedStatus(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.PUBLISHED_STATUS);
    }

    getTitle(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.TITLE);
    }

    getVisibility(){
        return this.imageData.getElementValue(ImageDataEnum.VISIBILITY);
    }

    setAllowComments(allowComments){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_COMMENTS, allowComments);
    }

    setAllowResale(allowResale){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_RESALE, allowResale);
    }

    setAltText(altText){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.ALT_TEXT, altText);
    }

    setCollectionName(collectionName){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.COLLECTION_NAME, collectionName);
    }

    setContentRating(contentRating){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.CONTENT_RATING, contentRating);
    }

    setCreationDatetime(datetime){

    }
    setDescription(description){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.DESCRIPTION, description);
    }

    setHashtags(hashtags){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.HASHTAGS, hashtags);
    }

    setLastEditDatetime(datetime){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.LAST_EDIT_TIMESTAMP, datetime);
    }
    setImageId(id){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_ID, id);
    }

    setImageFileData(fileData){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_DATA_FILE, fileData);
    }

    setImageFileUrl(fileUrl){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_FILE_URL, fileUrl);
    }

    setLanguageCode(languageCode){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.LANGUAGE_CODE, languageCode);
    }

    setPublishedStatus(publishedStatus){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.PUBLISHED_STATUS, publishedStatus);
    }

    setTitle(title){
        this.imageData.addOverrideNamedProperty(ImageDataEnum.TITLE, title);
    }

    /**
     * used internally to set the imageData values, but JS sucks and has no
     * idea what private or protected is
     * @param imageData
     */
    setValues(imageData){

        this.setAllowComments(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_COMMENTS, ''));
        this.setAllowResale(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.ALLOW_RESALE, ''));
        this.setAltText(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.ALT_TEXT, ''));
        this.setCollectionName(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.COLLECTION_NAME));
        this.setContentRating(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.CONTENT_RATING, ''));
        this.setCreationDatetime(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.CREATION_DATETIME, ''));
        this.setDescription(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.DESCRIPTION, ''));
        this.setHashtags(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.HASHTAGS, ''));
        this.setImageId(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_ID, ''));
        this.setImageFileData(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_DATA_FILE, ''));
        this.setImageFileUrl(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData,ImageDataEnum.IMAGE_FILE_URL, ''));
        this.setLanguageCode(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.LANGUAGE_CODE, ''));
        this.setLastEditDatetime(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.LAST_EDIT_TIMESTAMP, ''));
        this.setPublishedStatus(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.PUBLISHED_STATUS, ''));
        this.setTitle(Utils.getArrayValue(imageData, ImageDataEnum.TITLE, ''));
    }

}

export {ImageData};

Using the above I can request an images data from the server using AJAX. Then I pass the JSON Object, which was a PHP multidimensional array with keys and values converted to JSON, to this setValues() method.

I can then call the getters to get a value, it will either be a value or an empty string if nothing existed.

With this setup I can set default values when none exist. I also have enums which hold the values I will add as defaults to this later.

So as you can see this is highly useful. This way I can use the Enum anywhere I need a string and I don’t have to worry about spelling. If I do misspell something, I change it one time in one location and I am done. Otherwise I’d have to hunt down all the locations in the text etc. where I had hard coded a value.

But the limitation is Javascript is like WTF is this when you try to use them in Object literals. This is the only place I have found that they don’t work so far.

Dictating like…

It seems like the Javascript interpreter is trying to call a function when it sees the Enum constant reference inside an object literal.  But the rest of the time it works 100% fine. I only wanted this for testing so I’ll move on and not try using it inside object literals for testing LOL.

The work around

So I kept digging until I found a work around, a way to keep using my Fake enums and be able to build an object using the enums as the key names.

You need to use Object.defineProperty() to set a propertyusing the Enum and you get it back using Object.getOwnProperty(). I’ll update this article later when I have the time .

Links

Mozilla Developer Network Javascript class info

Mozilla Developer Network Javascript const info

Mozilla Developer Network javascript literal info

While working on this article I found this excellent article about using Enums in Javascript.

Categories
Software Development Web Development

Php Backed Enums don’t forget to call value

The one thing I don’t like about new PHP enums is, if you forget to call ->value you get exceptions “object can’t be converted to string” It is entirely too easy to forget to call ->value.

This means in places where I refactor code I have to remember to call ->value. Hence the article title “Php Backed Enums don’t forget to call value”

It is really easy to forget to call ->value when using these new Enums.

Well thanks to my IDE PhpStorm, I caught this error before it happened to me… in most places… most times. Nah not really I forget to call ->value all the time.

I like the concept of having an Enum class as up until version PHP 8.1 you had to create class constants and pretend they were real Enums.

Old php enums

Old PHP Enums Example

Here is how we used to do PHP Enums for forever until version 8.1

class ImageDataEnum
{
    const HEIGHT = 'height';
    const SIZE_STRING = 'size';
    const IMAGE_URL = 'image_url';
    const WIDTH = 'width';
}

And to use that in any code you simply did the following where you needed a value.

$height = ImageDataEnum::HEIGHT;

And inside $height would be the string “height” you could use this to make sure a value exists without having to spell it out every time, reducing the likelihood of bugs. This is very straight forward and easy. You can still add constants to Enum classes and use them, but it feels better using case instead.

New Enums

A backed enum looks like this. Note const is now case, class is now enum, but the rest is about the same.

enum ImageDataEnum: string
{
    case HEIGHT = 'height';
    case SIZE_STRING = 'size';
    case IMAGE_URL = 'image_url';
    case WIDTH = 'width';
}

Notice the word “string” you can use int or string but not a combination of both. Backed Enums Docs here.

Now to use the new Enums like the code above you do like this

$height = ImageDataEnum::HEIGHT->value;

Otherwise $height will be an object, one that contains  handy built in methods try() and tryFrom(). See the doc links for more info on that. You can also define your own methods.

But if you fail to call ->value and you try to use this for a string comparison you will get oopsies. You can use the IDE to hunt down all cases of the old class type enums.

//this won't work
if('height' === ImageDataEnum::HEIGHT ){
 //code to do stuff in here
}

The above will result in an error telling you the comparison is not possible. You can’t compare a string to an object.

//this will work
if('height' === ImageDataEnum::HEIGHT->value ){
 //code to do stuff in here
}

You can also call ImageDataEnum::HEIGHT->name which will return HEIGHT. So you can get the name and value using those methods.

Another nice thing about the new Enum classes is they are full on classes, you can add methods to them if you want. Like checking if a value matches any of the case values or whatever your use case is.

Enums are really handy for limiting what values can be entered by users and checking against them. Another good use I have found is creating a list of options for a Database table column.

Here is an example of a column in one of my tables that stores a medias content rating type. The system later uses this in many places to make sure that the media is of this type or that the user wants to see this type of media.

enum ContentRatingsEnum: string
{
    case EVERYONE = 'everyone';
    case MATURE = 'mature';
    case RATED_X = 'rated-x';
}

This column in a media table can only contain these values and users can only select from these values as their content preference type. This is helpful because I don’t have to type those strings in 100,000 places and when I need to change one I simply refactor with my IDE features.

Here is an excellent video that just came out about PHP ENUM’s the start of the video is anyways.

Categories
Web Development

Working with your apps local image assets in Symfony 5+

This article is mostly about managing your apps personal images and SVG files that it uses in your User Interface. It also explains how the Assets system works to the best of my abilities and discoveries.

This is the best info about assets, I have found in the docs about assets. It doesn’t mention some things that are handy to know. Like where is the configuration? There appears to be some sort of configuration in /config/packages/assets.yaml.

framework:
    assets:
        json_manifest_path: '%kernel.project_dir%/public/build/manifest.json'

It looks like this just points to the manifest.json file location.

I believe this is used when you call the template functions.

encore_entry_link_tags() and encore_entry_script_tags() functions

If you open that file you will you see a long list of all of your Javascript and CSS files that Webpack Encore manages.

{
  "build/app.css": "/build/app.css",
  "build/app.js": "/build/app.js",
  "build/app~registration~sogiDraw.js": "/build/app~registration~sogiDraw.js",
  "build/editAboutUser.js": "/build/editAboutUser.js",
  "build/featuredImage.js": "/build/featuredImage.js",
  "build/modalAction.js": "/build/modalAction.js",
  "build/registration.js": "/build/registration.js",
  "build/runtime.js": "/build/runtime.js",
  "build/sogiDraw.css": "/build/sogiDraw.css",
  "build/sogiDraw.js": "/build/sogiDraw.js",
  "build/vendors~app.js": "/build/vendors~app.js",
  "build/vendors~app~featuredImage~modalAction~registration.js": "/build/vendors~app~featuredImage~modalAction~registration.js",
  "build/vendors~app~featuredImage~modalAction~registration~sogiDraw.js": "/build/vendors~app~featuredImage~modalAction~registration~sogiDraw.js",
  "build/vendors~app~featuredImage~registration~sogiDraw.js": "/build/vendors~app~featuredImage~registration~sogiDraw.js",
  "build/vendors~app~registration.js": "/build/vendors~app~registration.js",
  "build/vendors~app~registration~sogiDraw.js": "/build/vendors~app~registration~sogiDraw.js",
  "build/vendors~editAboutUser.css": "/build/vendors~editAboutUser.css",
  "build/vendors~editAboutUser.js": "/build/vendors~editAboutUser.js",
  "build/vendors~editAboutUser~sogiDraw.js": "/build/vendors~editAboutUser~sogiDraw.js",
  "build/vendors~featuredImage~sogiDraw.js": "/build/vendors~featuredImage~sogiDraw.js",
  "build/vendors~sogiDraw.js": "/build/vendors~sogiDraw.js"
}

There is more than one way to work with assets in Symfony 5+. I use Webpack for my CSS and Javascript, so I use the related tags with those to import them into my templates.

Files that you let users upload are handled differently from files your app uses. Files your app uses will always be needed and won’t change, they are static in nature. Files your users upload will need to be edited, deleted etc. Also if you need assets like JS or CSS you should absolutely use Webpack and asset versioning it is way easier.

I won’t be using Webpack to handle my image and svg files. If I was doing a single page app, then that would maybe be my route.

What I need is access to some basic default images my app uses. Like an avatar for a user who hasn’t uploaded an image, or various SVG files used in the interfaces. These files can be stored in your apps public folder or in a CDN. If you are using something like Varnish cache or CloudFlare or both it doesn’t really matter if you keep them locally.

This article covers how I prefer to work with images and SVG’s my app will use. I’ll write another article about working with user uploaded images later.

You can display a SVG inside an img tag, which is what I do sometimes when I don’t need JS interaction with the SVG.

There might be more than one way to do this. I will cover what I  have found here so I can review it later if  I need to.

Using the Package class is easy. You do it like this.


 $package = new Package(new EmptyVersionStrategy());
 $defaultImage = '/images/app_art/click-edit.png';
        if(!empty($profileImageId)){
            //update this to get actual user image.
            $profileImageUrl = $package->getUrl($defaultImage);
        }

Here I have my images located in app/public/images/app_art/  This works if you know your files will never change. This lacks versioning(EmptyVersionStrategy()), so if you change the image, your users might never see it. This is because reverse proxy servers and other servers between your server and the users browser will cache the image and send the cached version. If you think you might make changes to the image in the future use the ( StaticVersionStrategy ) or else a large portion of your users will not see the new image.

Here is the Package class source code on github.

To say it another way it means that users who have downloaded the image before, their browsers will never download it again until the expires header or something similar. A new visitor or person who cleared their cache would get the new image. Versioning fixes this. This becomes a major PITA when working CSS and JS, so always use versioning with those or you will get magic errors due to the browser using cached versions.

homer simpson meme
don’t let your browser be a PITA

I should note here that this also works because I have the configuration set in my nginx to serve images from the public folder like this.

location /media/ {
	root /var/www/sogi/sogizmo/public;
	}

That opens the public folder to serve assets. When you use webpack encore to manage your JS and CSS it takes your files from the /assets/ folder and compiles them then stores them in the related folders inside the public folder usually inside the build folder.

As you can see above I have another folder within the public folder named images/ which I keep my app related images in. Inside the images folder I further break it down into the related images. Above you can see I am using an image from the app_art/ folder.

Also notice when I build the URI/URL for the image I don’t include the “/public/” part. The symfony template linking functions know where the file I need is located from the assets.yaml configuration file. All I need to do is include the subfolder “/image/” and the actual file name. I keep my assets in many subfolders named after the page or object that uses them.